Week Beginning Sunday, 3/6

Matthew 22-28


  • Read Matthew 22-28

I (Nancy) find it helpful when reading Cotton Patch to imagine myself sitting in a late 1950s rural, South Georgia church — or around a campfire in that region and time — as Clarence Jordan translates from the Greek, giving localized handles for the scandalous Gospel text. How did these variations sound in that context to hearers — most of whom, likely, had limited education and hadn’t traveled beyond a 100-mile radius of their community?

As you close the book of Matthew, here are some things to mull.

These last 7 chapters are filled with region– or era-specific versions of the original text.

  1. Do any of these variations fall flat for you? Resonate? Why do you suppose that’s true?
  2. Do you have any guesses about why Clarence may have used that image? (As always, there are no wrong answers.)
  3. What (if anything) stands out for you from this version about Jesus’ trial, execution and resurrection?
  • If you’re able, please respond with your thoughts by Saturday, 3/12, using the “Leave a Reply” box below. You may give your thoughts on the above questions or just thoughts of your own. What do you think?
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Week Beginning Sunday 2/28

Matthew 15-21


  • Read Matthew 15-21

Consider these questions as you read:

  1. In the paragraphs of 16:5 and 17:14, do you think Jesus’ words to His disciples seem more harsh in this paraphrase? Or do you feel this is how other translations represent this exchange?
  2. Was there anything in the story of the rich young ruler in 19:16 that you found profound or touched you in a unique way?
  3. Did something touch in a particular way from this reading?

Respond with your thoughts by Saturday, 3/5, using the “Leave a Reply” box below. You may give your thoughts on the above questions or just thoughts of your own. What do you think?

Week Beginning Sunday 2/21

Matthew 8-14


  • Read Matthew 8-14

Consider these questions as you read:

  1. Matthew 9.1-17 includes several examples of ‘contemporizing’ the text — using language and examples that might especially connect with mid-20th century Southerners. Do you find any ideas in these verses that put a different spin on the familiar words or that help you see them in a different way?
  2. Matthew 13 includes a number of parables. Did any of them strike you differently in this version?
  3. Did anything in particular capture your fancy or cause you to squirm?

Respond with your thoughts by Saturday, 2/27, using the “Leave a Reply” box below. You may give your thoughts on the above questions or just thoughts of your own. What do you think?

 

Week Beginning Sunday, 2/7

Getting the Lay of the Cotton Patch


  • Watch 5-minute video intro to Koinonia:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwIYJA7_klI&list=PL49B219E71C4FF54C

  • Read:
  1. Foreword by Tom Key (pages vii-xii)
  2. Introduction by Millard Fuller (pages xiii – xvi)
  3. A Note on the Cotton Patch Gospel – Matthew and John by Clarence Jordan (pages xii – xix)

Consider these questions as you read:

  1. What are you most anticipating in reading this unique paraphrase?
  2. Is there something that struck you in learning about Clarence Jordan?

Respond with your thoughts by Saturday, 2/13, using the “Leave a Reply” box below. You may give your thoughts on the above questions or just thoughts of your own. What do you think?

Week Beginning Sunday 2/14

Matthew 1-7


  • Read Matthew 1-7

 


Consider these questions as you read:

  1. What was your reaction to reading the story of Jesus’ birth in this different translation?
  2. Did anything strike you in the reading that you hadn’t noticed before?
  3. What did you think reading the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3-12)?

Respond with your thoughts by Saturday, 2/20, using the “Leave a Reply” box below. You may give your thoughts on the above questions or just thoughts of your own. What do you think?